Tesla engineers travel to ‘New Zealand, Alaska and beyond’ to test vehicles in winter conditions


Tesla engineers recently traveled to New Zealand and other cold climates to test the vehicles for winter conditions. Tesla shared a video of a vehicle traveling icy roads on Instagram with the caption: “POV: July winter testing.”

The EV maker then said that its engineers “travel to the ends of the earth–New Zealand, Alaska and beyond,” to test the vehicles in winter conditions throughout the year.

One of the common misconceptions about electric vehicles is that they don’t do so well during the winter months compared with internal combustion engine vehicles. Earlier this year there was a blizzard in Virginia that left hundreds of people stranded on the highway.

In response, the Washington Post published an op-ed theorizing that if these were all EVs, the disaster would have been much worse.

Several Tesla owners performed their own winter tests with their vehicles. @DirtyTesla found that with planning for emergencies such as the blizzard in Virginia, one could survive up to 36 hours in their Tesla.

Darryl Kolewaski, who owns Canada Electric Car Management, performed a winter test during a time when temperatures dropped to -35°C (-31°F).

With Camp Mode enabled on his 2014 Tesla Model S 85, the battery lasted a day and 17 hours during the average temperatures of -21°C (-5.8°F).

Tesla engineers were recently in Dubai testing the vehicles in extreme heat. Earlier this summer, the temperatures reached over 120°F. There was a lot of feedback suggesting that Tesla should perform winter testings and it seems that Tesla took that to heart.

Note: Johnna is a Tesla shareholder and supports its mission.

Your feedback is important. If you have any comments, or concerns, or see a typo, you can email me at johnna@teslarati.com. You can also reach me on Twitter at @JohnnaCrider1.

Teslarati is now on TikTok. Follow us for interactive news & more.

Tesla engineers travel to ‘New Zealand, Alaska and beyond’ to test vehicles in winter conditions










Source link

Related posts

Leave a Comment

twelve − two =